Etsy: While Etsy's popularity has declined recently, it's still a great resource for selling handmade items online. No need for complex ecommerce sites or merchant accounts or any sort of automation. The company takes a commission of every sale and charges a small listing fee per item. But many still use Etsy as their primary source of income. The best part is that you can also sell digital products on here such as poster designs. 
For example to dollarize the impact that the website has on the sales conversation, the closing rate (# of new sales / # of sales conversations) is tracked closely.  By comparing the closing rate before a change is made with the closing rate after changing the website content or the way it is used to setup the sales conversation, you’re able to see exactly how much impact the changes had on the business in terms of revenue.
It’s sometimes hard to comprehend just how much people love t-shirts. And with the right niche, marketing, and tools, you can create an online t-shirt business that makes you extra money online while you sleep. (Even Bloomberg and Forbes feature stories from entrepreneurs who've done just that.) Services like TeeSpring make it easier than ever to create a t-shirt drop-shipping business where they handle the sales, printing, and shipping, and you’re only responsible for design and marketing. For more tips, check out this simple guide to launching and marketing an online clothing store by my friends over at Selz.
The lead generation model is another viable option for monetizing a website. Through content in your website, you should attract users that can be registered as qualified leads that a company will use to turn into customers/clients. It is very important that the leads should be qualified, for you to get paid for bringing them to that company. The payment models are either pay per lead or pay per call.
I now have a general question that I hope you can address. My husband recently started a travel story/advice website in his first language, Spanish. He hopes to attract Google AdSense to it, but he understands that it will take time. I have just registered my own English site with SiteGround to offer the same content in English, but I don’t yet have an actual framework/theme for it. I’m not too concerned about that, as I can see that many themes would be suitable. I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed by all the details and mechanics of getting this going, however. I don’t want to stumble now if I can do it right, even if it takes a bit longer. My husband’s brother-in-law started his own site a few years ago in Italy and began to make a very lot of money. He then increased his efforts to several more sites, which made him even more money, but then the profits started to fall. My husband and I suspect that he actually decreased his own traffic with the new sites. We would like to have one quality site in 2 languages, which hopefully make money later; but we aren’t greedy and I feel strongly about creating decent content. (If you look at his current site, you will see that the articles are very long. We now realize they have to be shorter going forward!) If you have any advice for us, we would greatly appreciate it. Thank you in advance!
Whether you have a website or are still dreaming up ideas for a blog, you can also look into affiliate marketing. With affiliate marketing, you partner with brands and businesses within the content of your website. If you mention a product or service, you link to that produce or service using a unique affiliate code you received when you signed up for that particular affiliate program. From there, you’ll make money any time someone buys a product or service through your link.
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